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Published on May 7th, 2010 | by Janine Popick

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What’s In a Name? Choosing a Name for Your Email Newsletter

Creating a “name” for your weekly or monthly email marketing newsletter can be fun! You either want it to be catchy or you want it to be memorable but you want to call it “something.” We just had this conversation at VerticalResponse. We decided we wanted to market our newsletter a bit more and give it it’s own identity. It’s a great idea now that we’ve got a lot of readers.

Where Would You Advertise Your Newsletter?

First we start with where we’d want to market it. We chose the following: on our blog, on our website, on splash pages, in our newsletter and on pop up pages. We wanted to really convey what our recipients were going to get in our catchy name. But how do we go about selecting what the name should be?

The first thing we did was ask our Facebook fans and Twitter followers to vote on Facebook what they thought it should be. We set up a poll with some choices and what we found out was that our readers had a ton of clever ideas, over 35 of them! Plus it was a great way to get our readers interacting with us.

So we selected: The VR Buzz because for us it implies that there is a buzz around ideas for email marketing, growing your business, and it goes with a lot of branding we think we already have.

What a name does for your newsletter is “productize” it, so when you’re talking about why people should sign up to receive your newsletter, it has a branding component and tells a bit about your company.Here are some ideas you might want to consider, when you’re thinking about naming your own company email newsletter:

Determine Focus – You want to play off what your users will expect from you. Will you be writing content on about food? You’ll want to include something about that in your newsletter name.

  • SUCCESS Magazine has a newsletter called “Seeds of SUCCESS”
  • VerticalResponse customer the Alberta Chapter of the Canada Green Building Council has a newsletter called “News & Views Eblast [Today’s Date]”

Friendly & Inviting – You want your recipients to be excited to get your newsletter and you want them to forward it to their friends. Definitely have your newsletter name reflect who you are and why you want your recipients to read it.

  • MarketingProfs’ – “Get to the Point”
  • Grace Brooke – The Efficiency Specialist: Organizer’s Tool Bag
  • Disney – Disney Fans Insider
  • Crunch Gym’s “The Bench Press”

Set Expectations – Adding “Weekly” or “Monthly” might set your recipient’s expectations of how often they’ll be getting your newsletter.

  • Half Moon Bay Brewing Company Weekly Newsletter

Easy to Remember – You might not want to use the name of your newsletter in your subject line, after all you’ve only got about 40 characters to grab your recipient’s attention. However, in your email newsletter you might choose to keep the name to 2-4 words if you can. You want your recipients to put a face to your brand.

  • Continental Airlines’ – “InSights” newsletter
  • Food & Wine’s – “The Dish”

What’s your email newsletter’s name?

© 2010 – 2012, Janine Popick. All rights reserved.

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About the Author

is a contributing author for VerticalResponse.



2 Responses to What’s In a Name? Choosing a Name for Your Email Newsletter

  1. Mcubas says:

    In different cultures, naming a baby comes after the parents see the child. Part of that is the impression or energy that comes from connecting with the little one.
    Similarly, when naming anything, especially a newsletter, you want a clear communication connection.
    My ezine name is Business Influences! because I like the play on words. As a business coach, I report about contemporary business issues, the impacts on it and its impact on others, and share results with my subscribers.
    For me the most important aspect of business communications is the authenticity it brings. Veiled marketing ploys turn me off so I generalize that to my readers.
    One marketing principle I share with clients is how to become an eponym (think Kleenex and Xerox.) This type of branding is significant because it sticks. -MC

  2. Thanks for outlining these considerations for e-newsletter names. I’d also like some information about the results of testing various e-newsletter naming options. For example, I’ve heard that including the word “newsletter” in the name can cause spam-filter problems. Do you have any quantitative data about naming? Thanks.

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